The BOS covers a diverse range of habitats, from low level floodlands of the river Cherwell to the heights of Edge Hill and the Cotswolds. It also spans three major river systems of England - the Thames, Severn and Great Ouse. For a map of the area, see BOS area map.

As part of our fieldwork, we publish a detailed map showing the locations of recommended bird watching sites - see BOS Sites. The names of the sites are given in the BOS Guide for Observers.

The BOS is affected by the construction of HS2 - see this article for details: HS2 Route Across the BOS.

The table below lists the top 10 sites ranked by the number of species observed, for the years 2007-2016. Many of these sites are reserves managed by the BOS and most are associated with water. Our reservers are listed here: BOS Reserves.

  Grid Number of Species Site Name
1 SP4542 148 Grimsbury Reservoir
2 SP4953 145 Boddington Reservoir
3 SP3942 143 Balscote Quarry
4 SP4451 139 Wormleighton Reservoir
5 SP5721 119 Bicester Wetland Reserve
6 SP4643 112 Upper Cherwell Valley
7 SP3226 96 Glyme Farm
8 SP4541 95 Spiceball Country Park
9 SP4249 94 Farnborough Park
10 SP3558 91 Chesterton Pools

 

The picture below shows the species density for each 1km square of the BOS area for the years 1982-2016. The figures in each square show the number of species recorded at that location. The numbers on the outsite are the OS 1km grid references for the 100km square SP. The map shows there are many other good locations to observe birds, including the whole of the Cherwell valley.

Species Density 1982 2016

HS2

Construction work on HS2 Phase One is due to commence in 2018, with completion scheduled for 2026. HS2 crosses the BOS area from Brackley to Southam via Chipping Warden. Read more ...

Deer, Woodlands and Birds - should we be in a flap?  -   Jamie Cordery

Jamie Cordery is South East Deer Liaison Officer for The Deer Initiative, a broad partnership of statutory, voluntary and private interests dedicated to ensuring the delivery of a sustainable and well-managed wild deer population in England and Wales.

The Long Day Count is carried out by teams of observers in each of the twelve 10km squares recording the number of bird species seen during a maximum of 12 daylight hours on the second Sunday in May each year.   Read more ...

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