This book, published by Oliver V. Aplin in 1889, presents the first definitive list of the birds of Oxfordshire. Aplin was a resident of Bloxham, just outside of Banbury, so there is a significant amount of content relating to the BOS coverage area.The bulk of the book is given over to a species-by-species account of all of the birds that were regarded has having occured within the county along with their current status.

The frontspiece is notable for giving pride of place to an Alpine Chough, shot in the locality, but much disputed, even at that time, as not being a wild bird but rather more likely being an escape.

There are 242 species listed, of which 60 are classified as resident and 71 migrants, the rest being occasional or accidental visitors. 92 species are noted as being regular breeders.

A digital copy of the book can be downloaded and read from this link: The Birds of Oxfordshire.

The BOS conducted a survey of Yellowhammers in the first 2 weeks of July 2018 to determine their population abundance, distribution and breeding status. All members and the general public were invited to participate. Read more ...

 Up, down and a possible turnaround? - Oxfordshire's Curlews past, present and future  -  Mike Pollard


One of our rarest and most charismatic breeding birds, the Curlew is the "poster-bird" of hay meadows and pastures in Oxfordshire and is now officially the UK's highest priority bird for conservation action. Read more ...

A survey where observers are each given a randomly selected 1km square and record all species and numbers of each for a minimum period of 2 hours between 9am and noon. Read more ...

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